14 died because of heavy flooding in Thailand

14 died because of heavy flooding in Thailand.

Thailand’s floods have taken 14 lives and severely affected holiday islands of south as country goes into December-January peak season of tourism, authorities stated on Tuesday.

A system of low pressure has carried serious rain to regions of south comprising the Pha Ngan and Samui islands in Thailand’s Gulf, and also floods have disengaged the rail connection to south and further than Malaysia.

Visiting the attractions has been an exceptional dazzling spot for a nation that has resisted gaining grip since army held power in bloodless revolution in 2014 to finish months of unrest of politics.

On 13th of Oct the death of long-ruling Bhumibol Adulyadej, the King forced the country into sorrow and also hoisted questions regarding arrivals of tourist though the system state the nation is available for business regardless of a year of grief.

“There has been serious rain as compared to usual which has originated problems of drainage,” on Samui island, Nongyao Jirundom of state Tourism Authority of Thailand said.

The Warning Centre of National Disaster stated 14 Thai citizen’s life has been taken in different accidents due to weather in dissimilar regions of south.

Trains have been stopped in Thung Song town in province of Nakhon Si Thammarat due to flooding.

447 mm of rainfall is noted in Nakhon Si Thammarat in previous 7 days, 380 mm extra than usual for this point of year, according to the data.

December is marked as the starting of dry season as tourists come down on palm bordered beaches to celebrate New Year holidays and Christmas.

In spite of mourning phase for deceased king, the system are optimistic regarding the viewpoint for sightseeing, which is calculated s 10 % of total domestic creation.

The ministry of tourism anticipates a record arrival this year of 32.4 million.

Extensive flooding in 2011 took life of over 900 people and due to its major disturbance to industry was seen and the economic growth was cut down to only 0.1 % that year.